The Boston Aquapocalypse

Less than a fortnight ago, we wrote an article on “How to Survive the Apocalypse” using many of the air and water filters that we sell. In it, we wrote this sage advice:

“Don’t wait until it’s too late, folks. If you call us the day after the apocalypse, we probably won’t be working. Play it safe and stock up on these filters now, so you’ll know how to survive the apocalypse when and if that day comes.”

We hope some Boston residents heeded our advice.

Sure, we didn’t coin the term “aquapocalypse” that is making its rounds in articles, tweets and status updates across the Internet, but all of the advice we gave on how to survive the apocalypse still stands.

So, how did the Boston aquapocalypse occur? A collar connecting two major water pipes ruptured on Saturday. The water being sent to many Boston-area homes was not safe as a result, and state officials urged residents to boil their tap water. The water was reported to be safe for bathing in and doing dishes, but not consuming.

As a result of the water crisis, many residents of Boston and its surrounding cities made a run for bottled water at stores. The demand for the bottled water was so great that many consumers fought over the liquid.

While it’s not a funny situation by any means, it is ironic that Concord, MA — about 18 miles away from Boston — has banned the sale of bottled water, starting in 2011. Adding further to the irony of the situation is that the aquapocalypse should come during National Drinking Water Week.

The writers of Universal Hub, a blog about all-things Boston, chose to make light of the situation as well. Adam Gaffin, the founder of the blog, worked with designer Holly Gordon to create an “I Survived the Aquapocalypse” logo. You can wear your survival like a badge of honor on a t-shirt, or you can purchase a coffee mug or mousepad bearing the logo.

The term aquapocalypse is pretty humorous, and we have to admit that our “How to Survive the Apocalypse” article was a bit tongue-in-cheek. But there’s no denying that many of the emergency water filters we wrote about in that article would be put to good use in Boston right now.