Falling Back to Standard Time

The term “Daylight Savings Time” is generally understood to mean the time when we either set our clocks forward or back one hour, and the 6 month period of time in between these points. Although this term is widely used, the correct term is Daylight Saving Time, and the actual period that is Daylight Saving Time lasts from spring until fall. The period from fall to spring is actually referred to as Standard Time. So as the time approaches for us to fall back to Standard Time on Sunday, November 6, at 2 am, this is a good way to remind ourselves to do some yearly maintenance around the home, such as changing batteries in smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors, and changing the filters in our furnaces and air conditioning systems, as well as any other filters around the home, such as water filters.

We offered many of these suggestions and tips in our October 24th and November 1st blogs. Some of these bear repeating, such as changing smoke alarm batteries. Changing furnace and air conditioning filters is a good way to ensure the air in your home stays clean and fresh, that your heating or cooling system doesn’t use excess energy, and to extend the life of your heating or cooling system. Filters Fast offers a wide selection of furnace filters and air conditioning filters for your home.  We also offer water filters for your water purification system, refrigerator, and ice maker.

The approaching time change reminds us all to do those household maintenance tasks that might otherwise go undone. This is also a good time to prepare our homes for the coming winter months. Winterizing is a simple yet effective way to ensure that energy isn’t lost through cracks and other escape routes in the home. As Benjamin Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Taking this time now to ensure our homes are safe, clean, and energy efficient will keep winter outside where it belongs.

 

Controlling Indoor Allergens

Itchy nose, watery eyes, frequent sneezing, scratchy throat—these are all too familiar allergy symptoms to the over 40 million allergy sufferers out there. And often it seems to those affected by indoor/ outdoor allergies that they are at the mercy of Mother Nature. But there are many things you can do to make your home less likely to trigger allergies, mostly by enacting a course of action that involves cleaning up and reducing the number of hiding places for indoor allergens.

According to an Infographic on the website allergybegone.com, many common indoor allergens can be reduced by taking simple steps to make your home less friendly to these allergens. Common indoor allergens include:

  • Dust
  • Dust Mites
  • Pet Dander
  • Pollen
  • Cockroaches
  • Mold
  • Endotoxins

Treatment for dust includes mopping and vacuuming with a vacuum cleaner that has a HEPA filter in it. Also adding an air cleaner with a HEPA or electrostatic filter can keep dust to a minimum.

Dust mites are often found in mattresses and bedding. By cleaning bedding every 7 to 10 days in hot water , and not using mattress pads these allergy triggers can be somewhat controlled.

Bathing your pets often and using an air cleaner can help to keep pet dander at bay.

Pollen in the home can be reduced by keeping doors and windows closed and using an air conditioner. Also showering or bathing before bed can help keep pollen at a minimum in your home.

Cockroach debris is another allergen found in indoor air. By following common cockroach control practices— keeping all food sealed, not keeping pet food out for extended periods of time, keeping all cracks and holes sealed— this allergen can be lessened.

Mold loves to grow in bathrooms. By regularly cleaning bathroom surfaces with bleach and water, removing houseplants, not carpeting bathrooms, and using mold-proof paint, mold can be kept to a minimum.

The same control methods for dust and mold helps reduce endotoxins, bacteria that can live in dust.

Keeping your home clean and reducing hiding places for allergens by eliminating carpeting and bulky drapes and furniture where possible helps make your indoor air friendly to allergy sufferers.

Using Humidifiers to Treat Your Child’s Cold

According to the Mayo Clinic website, “The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends that parents avoid using cough and cold medicines to treat children younger than age 2.” Potential drawbacks to using these medicines include possible side effects such as rapid heart rate and convulsions, and the fact that cold medicines mask present symptoms. Also, cold medicines don’t treat the underlying symptoms, so giving them to your child won’t make their cold go away any sooner.

All this begs the question: what can you do for a child’s cold? The old standbys seem to work the best: plenty of rest and fluids, cough drops to soothe a sore throat, and moistening nasal passages. One method for moistening these passages is running a cool mist humidifier. Filters Fast offers a wide variety of cool mist humidifiers to help comfort your child when they’re sick.

Here are some tips for operating cool mist humidifiers from Crane:

  • Use clean, cool water
  • Place your humidifier on waterproof surface approximately 3 feet off the ground
  • Keep your humidifier out of corners and away from walls
  • Adjust your humidifier so that it sprays up into the air, not down to the ground
  • Use a few capfuls of white vinegar and a half tub of warm water to clean

Your cool mist humidifier can be run year round to keep your family healthy and happy. Optimum humidity level in the home is 40-50% relative humidity.

Crane also states on their website that you could be eligible for a tax deduction if you doctor recommends using a cool mist humidifier primarily for medical reasons.

It’s difficult to see children suffer when they have a cold, but using these “comfort” measures, including the use of a cool mist humidifier, can make them more comfortable while they’re on the mend.