The International Version of the GE MWF Refrigerator Filter

GE MWF SmartWater Refrigerator Filter INT VersionPut the word “international” in front of any word or phrase, and you immediately sound like a well-traveled bon vivant.

International politics.

International House of Pancakes.

International refrigerator filter?

Now, you might be tempted to think an international fridge filter would only work in fancy European refrigerators, but this is not the case. In fact, the GE MWFINT Refrigerator Filter is identical to the popular GE MWF Refrigerator Filter in almost every way. It fits the same refrigerator applications, it removes the same contaminants, and it has the same NSF certifications. As you can see by the photo, the international filter features a green graphic, while the standard GE MWF filter has a blue graphic. Oh, and there’s one more difference — the international version is less expensive than the standard MWF refrigerator filter. Go green, save green.

Our cost is lower on the international version, and we want to pass those savings on to you. We can assure you this filter will work in any refrigerator that uses the regular GE SmartWater MWF Filter. It is even made in the same American factory as the GE MWF filter. The international version has a filter life of 300 gallons.

So if you’re currently using the GE MWF SmartWater Filter and want to save a couple bucks, you might want to consider the new GE MWFINT Refrigerator Filter. We think you’ll enjoy the savings, and perhaps you’ll even find the international version a bit more refined.  If not, there’s always IHOP.

Priest Turns Tap Water into Holy Water for Orthodox Romanians

Holy Water

Last year, we wrote about how a small church used bottled water for Baptism, and then shortly after that we wrote about a South Korean professor who was charged with fraud for selling machines he claimed could turn tap water into holy water.

Just last week, an Orthodox priest, Zaharia Peres, claimed to do the same. Only this time, the priest had no ulterior motive for turning tap water into holy water. And he didn’t need a machine.

Instead, Peres consecrated all of Timisoara’s tap water at once. He stood over the reservoirs that supplied the city so that everyone in the city might have access to the holy water. Many opted to go directly to the church to get their fill of holy water, fearing that the water might lose some of its power by travelling through rusty pipes.

Tea Bag Water Filter

nanoteabag

IMAGE CREDIT: emerginggreen.wordpress.com

You wake up one morning,  head to the kitchen and place a tea bag in your cup. Are you drinking green, black, oolong? Or is that tea bag filled with activated carbon, leaving you not with tea but with clean drinking water?

The newly designed “Tea Bag Water Filter” does just that. The filter uses a basic tea bag design to contain activated carbon, which can remove chemical contaminants. This is why so many of our water filters use some form of carbon. Carbon can adsorb (not absorb) chlorine, lead, mercury, zinc and more, and it is  used in Brita pitchers, inline filters, fridge filters, RO systems and even air filters.

But the tea bag water filter doesn’t stop there. The prototype, designed by Stellenbosch University’s Professor Cloete, also uses a biocide on the outside of the bag to kill off bacteria. Cloete cautions that “all technology has its limits,” but he also says that they have yet to find a bacteria the tea bag water purifier can’t kill.

Perhaps the most attractive aspect of the water filter is its ease of use. The filter attaches to the neck of a standard water bottle, so you have only to place it in your bottle, fill it up, and you’ve got filtered water at your fingertips.

So where can you buy the tea bag water filter? Not at FiltersFast— yet. The tea bag water filter is currently in production, though Cloete is working with manufacturers and hopes to have a version ready for sale by next month.

When you do purchase the teabag filter, you might be able to take comfort in the fact that your purchase also supports clean water initiatives in developing countries. Cloete hopes that a surcharge can be added to the purchase price so that a portion of all sales will lessen costs of the units for citizens of developing countries who may not otherwise be able to afford them.

Update: It appears this filter is not widely available at online and retail stores. We will keep you posted.