Cure Cold Symtpoms with these Adorable Humidifiers!

Is the fall air making your child a restless sleeper? Oftentimes the dry air can lead to chapped lips, dry skin, cold symptoms and severe congestion that can easily disrupt sleep.  Rather than treating your child’s symptoms with cold and cough medicine, consider using a humidifier. A humidifier will increase the moisture in your child’s room, making it easy for him or her to breathe clearly. In particular, a cool mist humidifier will release fine droplets of cool mist into the air. To protect your child and keep him or her sleeping soundly, consider these fun, kid friendly humidifiers by Crane:

 

Crane EE-8189: The Crane Owl is my personal favorite! This sage owl will provide your kids with the cool, humidified air they need, while blending nicely into their room. This humidifier has a 2.1 gallon output of humidified air per day.

 

Crane EE-4139: The Crane Pig will help prevent flu, cold and cough symptoms. The EE-4139 features a 10 hour running time and is perfect for rooms up to 250 square feet in size.

 

 

Crane EE-4109: Hello Kitty enthusiasts will love this humidifier! The Crane Ultrasonic Cool Mist Humidifier, Hello Kitty includes a night light and variable speeds.  The pink and white Hello Kitty humidifier is perfect for your little girl’s room!

 

Crane EE-5063: For  Sponge Bob lovers, old and young, the Sponge Bob humidifier is a great appliance. This humidifier will provide relief from sinus congestion and flu symptoms. The fun Sponge Bob design will look great in any room and it includes a night light.

 

Crane EE-3186: The Crane Elephant will alleviate cold and flu symptoms without the use of medicines. The blue and white elephant humidifier features an automatic shut off and water level indicator.

 

If Sponge Bob or Hello Kitty isn’t your thing, take a look at our other Crane humidifiers. Be sure to keep a clean humidifier tank with the use of the Humidiclean Humidifier Cleaner and Descaler. It is important to maintain the inside of your humidifiers tank as a dirty tank will lead to a build up that can be released into your homes air.

Controlling Indoor Allergens

Itchy nose, watery eyes, frequent sneezing, scratchy throat—these are all too familiar allergy symptoms to the over 40 million allergy sufferers out there. And often it seems to those affected by indoor/ outdoor allergies that they are at the mercy of Mother Nature. But there are many things you can do to make your home less likely to trigger allergies, mostly by enacting a course of action that involves cleaning up and reducing the number of hiding places for indoor allergens.

According to an Infographic on the website allergybegone.com, many common indoor allergens can be reduced by taking simple steps to make your home less friendly to these allergens. Common indoor allergens include:

  • Dust
  • Dust Mites
  • Pet Dander
  • Pollen
  • Cockroaches
  • Mold
  • Endotoxins

Treatment for dust includes mopping and vacuuming with a vacuum cleaner that has a HEPA filter in it. Also adding an air cleaner with a HEPA or electrostatic filter can keep dust to a minimum.

Dust mites are often found in mattresses and bedding. By cleaning bedding every 7 to 10 days in hot water , and not using mattress pads these allergy triggers can be somewhat controlled.

Bathing your pets often and using an air cleaner can help to keep pet dander at bay.

Pollen in the home can be reduced by keeping doors and windows closed and using an air conditioner. Also showering or bathing before bed can help keep pollen at a minimum in your home.

Cockroach debris is another allergen found in indoor air. By following common cockroach control practices— keeping all food sealed, not keeping pet food out for extended periods of time, keeping all cracks and holes sealed— this allergen can be lessened.

Mold loves to grow in bathrooms. By regularly cleaning bathroom surfaces with bleach and water, removing houseplants, not carpeting bathrooms, and using mold-proof paint, mold can be kept to a minimum.

The same control methods for dust and mold helps reduce endotoxins, bacteria that can live in dust.

Keeping your home clean and reducing hiding places for allergens by eliminating carpeting and bulky drapes and furniture where possible helps make your indoor air friendly to allergy sufferers.

Prepare for a Longer and More Severe Fall Allergy Season

AllergiesFall is quickly approaching and it looks like allergy sufferers are in for a tough season. ABC News recently reported that “with record pollen counts already on the board for August, this fall is gearing up to be on the worst, and longest, allergy seasons yet. “  Allergy experts and scientists have noted that this allergy season may be a few weeks longer than the last few years.

Because  of a “a particularly wet summer, ragweed pollen levels are surging and standing water left over from summer flooding and Hurricane Irene has increased the amount of mold, a common year-round allergen, in the air.”

Pollen from trees and grass are the major triggers for spring allergy sufferers, but ragweed pollen is the typical trigger for most fall allergy issues. The fall allergy season “usually runs from mid-August until the first frost of the year, around early October, but if the frost is delayed, as is predicted for this year, the allergy season goes on indefinitely until it comes.”

Scientists have also argued that climate change is a source of the lengthening allergy seasons. Warmer weather leads to warmer, longer-lasting autumns, which in turn means that there’s less frost to destroy ragweed and prevent allergies.  In addition, higher temperatures lead to a similar problem with spring allergies, including spring starting nearly a month early.

Dr. Clifford Bassett, Medical director of Allergy and Asthma Care of New York, also notes that “single ragweed plant produces a million pollen grains, but if you expose it to greenhouse gases, it produces three to four times that much. So you have climate change making for a longer season, more plants and more potent pollen. It’s like a perfect storm.”

Allergy experts advise that you should take extra precautions this fall allergy season: “limit your exposure to the pollen, such as taking off outdoor clothing before coming into the bedroom or wearing sunglasses to prevent pollen from blowing into your eyes. Most importantly, if symptoms become severe or over-the-counter treatments don’t seem to be working, see an allergist.”