Global Usage of Air and Water Filters Increases

Air & Water Filter Use Increases Globally

Reports about poor air and water conditions are reaching global proportions. The growing need for air and water filters result from inadequate conditions of current air and water quality. We see evidence of the rising concern about clean air and safe drinking water demonstrated through various charities dedicated to addressing this dilemma internationally. Such concerns are invoking the immediate implementation of stricter air and water pollution regulations.

Together, the United States and Europe account for a major share of the global air filter and filtration equipment market. The demand for air filters in developing countries will outpace the type of mature growth in markets such as the United States, Japan and Europe. China is expected to supersede Japan by becoming the second largest market for air filtration equipment behind the U.S.

Recently, the Freedonia Group, a leading international business research company, released a market analysis about the increased demand for filters in China. They reported that by 2014 the demand for air and water filters in China is projected to grow by 13.5% annually to 66.2 billion Yuan (Chinese currency). Comparatively, this growth is approximately $10.2 billion in U.S. dollars. The increased demand in China is supported by a rapid growth in motor vehicle and other transportation equipment production, stocks, government policies that promote energy conservation and emission reductions. Sales of fluid filters will be fueled by the growth in non-agricultural water use and expanding urbanization. Sales of air filters are projected to single-handedly rise by 13.7% per year through 2014.

The demand for increased global usage of filters will be spurred by rising manufacturing output of HVAC equipment, metal products, building construction materials, chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Many of these manufactured products are either equipped with air filters or produced in manufacturing facilities with high air purification requirements. As income levels grow, more people in China will be able to afford water and air purification equipment for their homes. The growing demand for higher quality and extended life filters are likely to boost the overall market value.

Cutting edge technology along with innovation in air and water filtration media, product design, cost and efficiency will boost future growth. The outlook remains optimistic as consumer spending increases and the shift for better air and water filtration continues to make progress.

 

How to Boost Restaurant Sales with Filtered Water

As a former restaurant employee, I’m well aware of the necessity of boosting check averages in order to increase tips. Usually (though not always), the higher your sales, the more money you are likely to make as a server. Anyone who has worked in the restaurant industry before knows that offering guests bottled water is one of several techniques that can help you boost sales.

But the bottled water industry, as of late, has received so much backlash, and in today’s economic recession, fewer people are buying bottled water at restaurants, despite the clever efforts of servers to pressure them into it:

“Sir, do you prefer still, sparkling … or just tap”  (said with a slight air of condescension and maybe even a small frown)?

These days, most people are not afraid to say “Charlotte’s (or whatever city you live in’s) finest”, with a confident grin. It was always frustrating to me when I was a server; however, now that I see the absurdity of bottled water (and now that I am thankfully no longer employeed in the food and beverage industry), I have joined the ranks of fellow tap water drinkers. After all, it’s “free”.

I used to receive this question, quite often, however: “Is your water filtered?” Sadly, in the last restaurant I worked in, it was not. You could taste the trace amounts of metal that often give unfiltered water that “tappy” taste. (Looking back, I understand now, why people would ask for water with extra lemon…). Perhaps the reason for serving unfiltered water was simply cost – not paying for foodservice water filters is less expensive, after all… or is it?

What if selling filtered water, by the glass, instead of serving unfiltered water for free, could actually help restaurants boost their sales? Bottled water is ridiculously priced, but if restaurants invested in filtration systems, perhaps they could sell glasses of filtered water for less than a dollar a piece, (refills included?) and still make a small profit off of water sales. At the very least, they could recover the cost of the filtration system, make their customers happier by serving filtered water, and boost their overall reputation if nothing else. If people have the choice between tap for free and filtered for the price of what ultimately amounts to pocket change, I’m willing to bet they’d choose the latter. What do you think?

You could even serve it in a stemmed glass, as this tends to make non-bottled water seem more appealing