Desalination: The Solution to the Global Drinking Water Crisis?

As the global water crisis persists, many around the world are looking for new freshwater resources. One way viewed as a freshwater resource is seawater. But why? Many know that seawater is not safe for human consumption, so why is it even being considered? Look no further than Desalination as the reason. Desalination refers to the removal of salts and minerals from water supplies to create fresh and drinkable water. Proponents argue that desalination can be used where freshwater supplies are scarce, but seawater is plentiful. The theory is that desalination plants can be built to supply a community with fresh water for households, manufacturing and agriculture. It is also argued that it would increase the freshwater supply and give millions more access to freshwater.

However, many argue that the cost of desalination is simply too high. Desalinated water could cost five times more than the cost of harvesting other sources of freshwater. In poorer areas, the cost of desalination is even higher and the funds are limited there as well. Another main argument is that it would do nothing stop water waste. Many point out that the key to ending the global water crisis is to focus on water management and sensible usage of water (i.e. cutting back on water usage to conserve).

During this debate, we can’t forget the importance that Reverse Osmosis Systems (or RO systems) have for our own water supply at home. RO systems contain tiny pores through which water can flow. These small pores are restrictive to organic compounds like salt and other natural minerals. Here is a RO system suggestion that will benefit you and your family.

1240MSeries

The Hydrotech M Series Reverse Osmosis System filters water through 4 stages to make sure that your water is free from dissolved solids and organics, and free from pathogens and VOCs that could be present in your homes tap water.

The debate on desalination is just heating up and you can expect to hear more about it in the months and years ahead. But what do you think? Do you think desalination can be a solution to the global water crisis? Or do you think we should focus more on water management and other freshwater resources?