Activate Vitamin Water

Activate bottled waterFans of Vitamin Water may be disappointed to learn that vitamins may lose potency if stored in water for extended periods of time.

Enter Activate – the only brand of bottled water on the market that has vitamins, antioxidants and other supplements in powder form hidden in the cap, which are released with just one twist, just before drinking. How did this concept come to be?

“Friends Anders Eisner and Burke Eiteljorg were sitting in the Denver airport four years ago. Anders was trying to pour Airborne, a supposed cold-fighting dietary supplement, into a bottle of water. Burke was doing the same with Emergen-C, another vitamin drink mix. Both were making a mess. There had to be a tidier way, they decided.”

Activate comes in eight flavors. Some emphasize health and immunity boosters, while others are workout drinks with electrolytes. The drinks contain Stevia, a much healthier alternative to the sugar used in Vitamin Water and other similar beverages. While we applaud the company’s innovation and drive to be healthier than most, we still have the problem of plastic bottle waste on our hands. Perhaps Eisner and Eiteljorg wouldn’t have made such a mess if they had a wide-mouthed reusable bottle like this Klean Kanteen instead. Moreover, the beverage sells for $1.79 to $2.29 per bottle:

“Some balk at the price, but Holland [the company's president] says, ‘If you bought a bottle of water and Emergen-C it would cost you $2.’”

Precisely why we shouldn’t be buying bottles of water in the first place! We’ve said it many times and we’ll say it again. Save money with your own supplement packets and/or pills, and fill up your reusable water bottle with filtered tap water instead.

84-year-old Man Survives Five Days in Desert Without Water

windshield wiper fluid84 year old, Henry Morello, was found alive in an Arizona desert after five days of being stranded there. He took a wrong turn while driving home from the Phoenix suburb of Cave Creek on Feb. 7, and ended up in a ditch after making a U-turn.

We thought his survival skills were especially good for a man his age, and worth noting. First he ripped a chrome piece off of his car and put it on the roof hoping someone would see the reflection and find him. His phone and car battery went dead, so he used car mats to stay warm and read a car manual from cover to cover to pass the time. But the most interesting part of it all is how he chose to stay hydrated. Since he didn’t have access to water, he filtered windshield wiper fluid through a napkin and drank it as a substitute.

He was found alive by a group of hikers after five days. Though his kidneys are damaged, he arrived at the hospital in good condition, considering all that he had been through. He learned a few lessons from this adventure, the main one being to never drive without water.

We’d like to reach out to Morello and let him know that his story is a lesson to all. Do not leave the house without your reusable stainless steel water bottle, and make sure it’s full of filtered water before taking a trip. And, in case of an emergency, make sure you have some napkins on hand, in case you do need to drink windshield wiper fluid. (We’ll soon be testing out the filtration skills of a napkin, so stay tuned for a video on that.) In the meantime, get prepared for any emergency that may strike, by stocking your survival kit with these items from Filters Fast. Clearly, Morello would have been much better off with a Katadyn Bottle Water Filter.

How to Boost Restaurant Sales with Filtered Water

As a former restaurant employee, I’m well aware of the necessity of boosting check averages in order to increase tips. Usually (though not always), the higher your sales, the more money you are likely to make as a server. Anyone who has worked in the restaurant industry before knows that offering guests bottled water is one of several techniques that can help you boost sales.

But the bottled water industry, as of late, has received so much backlash, and in today’s economic recession, fewer people are buying bottled water at restaurants, despite the clever efforts of servers to pressure them into it:

“Sir, do you prefer still, sparkling … or just tap”  (said with a slight air of condescension and maybe even a small frown)?

These days, most people are not afraid to say “Charlotte’s (or whatever city you live in’s) finest”, with a confident grin. It was always frustrating to me when I was a server; however, now that I see the absurdity of bottled water (and now that I am thankfully no longer employeed in the food and beverage industry), I have joined the ranks of fellow tap water drinkers. After all, it’s “free”.

I used to receive this question, quite often, however: “Is your water filtered?” Sadly, in the last restaurant I worked in, it was not. You could taste the trace amounts of metal that often give unfiltered water that “tappy” taste. (Looking back, I understand now, why people would ask for water with extra lemon…). Perhaps the reason for serving unfiltered water was simply cost – not paying for foodservice water filters is less expensive, after all… or is it?

What if selling filtered water, by the glass, instead of serving unfiltered water for free, could actually help restaurants boost their sales? Bottled water is ridiculously priced, but if restaurants invested in filtration systems, perhaps they could sell glasses of filtered water for less than a dollar a piece, (refills included?) and still make a small profit off of water sales. At the very least, they could recover the cost of the filtration system, make their customers happier by serving filtered water, and boost their overall reputation if nothing else. If people have the choice between tap for free and filtered for the price of what ultimately amounts to pocket change, I’m willing to bet they’d choose the latter. What do you think?

You could even serve it in a stemmed glass, as this tends to make non-bottled water seem more appealing