Going Green By Recycling Water Filters for World Water Day

Image Credit: tinleypark.org

St. Patrick’s Day is not the only reason why we’re celebrating “Going Green.” With Spring announcing its arrival next week and World Water Day falling on March 22, the call to action for being good stewards of our environment is more urgent than ever. If we don’t take care of our environment, our environment will definitely turn on us. We are paying homage to the value of going green as it relates to water. It comes as no surprise that the birthstone for March is an Aquamarine. This pale blue gemstone whose name originates from the Roman word “Aqua” meaning water and “Mare” meaning sea resembles the color of seawater.

For decades, we have grown familiar with the term “Going Green.” It is a ubiquitous statement that defines our worldwide ecosystem and the lives of humans and animal life everywhere. Around the world people, businesses and charities are making great strides by building communities to raise awareness about caring for and nurturing our neighbors and our planet.

As we prepare to celebrate World Water Day on March 22, Filters Fast would like to recognize some of our water filter vendors who have implemented impressive recycling programs for their products and going green initiatives.

Mavea offers a comprehensive recycling program where every part is broken down, cleaned and re-used. Nothing goes to the landfill. Return a minimum of 6 “Mavea” filters (only). They will pay the shipping costs. Simply request a pre-paid shipping label. https://www.mavea.com/mavea/mavea-recycling.html?L=0

Rainshow’r is now proud to partner with Active Recycling, an environmentally aware recycler, who understands our desire to limit our impact. For more information about their recycling program visit http://www.rainshowermfg.com/page6/page6.html.

Brita has a recycling campaign that recycles its carbon filters for the pitchers and faucet attachment models. For more information on recycling your Brita, filter visit http://www.brita.com/.

ZeroWater recycles their filters by separating each filter, then sending the plastic along with the materials inside to be sent to various facilities for reuse. Visit http://ww2.zerowater.com/recycling/ for more information.

Everpure water filtration products are recyclable and details on recycling locations can be found at www.everpure.com/ or  you can contact Everpure at (800) 323-7873.

Make sure you are only sending filters made by these companies to avoid being charged for additional shipping. Through recycling, we can significantly reduce the amount of waste that litters our landfills and save energy compared to creating new waste with new products. Everything we do or don’t do plays a vital role in the health and dynamics of planet Earth.

How to Choose a Water Pitcher Filter

What do you look for in a water filter pitcher? Sleek design? Advanced technology? Affordability?

Manufacturers of water pitcher filters take these factors into consideration when marketing their products.  Perhaps the most well-known pitcher filter on the market today is the Brita brand, with $5 billion in sales. Seven out of ten pitchers sold to consumers bear the Brita name. With so many alternate brands on the market, it’s only natural to wonder why.

In 2000, Brita sold sole rights to its brand to the Clorox Company. Seven years later, the MAVEA brand was launched by former Brita CEO Markus Hankammer. With a newer, contemporary, stylish design, the MAVEA Elemaris pitchers are priced at $32 to $40. Clorox-owned Brita carafes range from $11 to $32, with its latest, comparable upscale design priced at $23. (Is it safe to assume that the top priority for consumers is affordability?)

Nick Vlahos, vice president of Clorox’s Brita division thinks so. However, Hankammer argues that as these pitchers become less trendy over time, good design becomes more and more of a necessity. MAVEA pitchers have a rubber base and soft-grip handle, with a sleek design that looks great on any dinner table. MAVEA also claims to be ahead of the game in filtration technology, with a unique oval-shaped micromesh filter that prevents carbon fragments from escaping into the water. (I’m sure we’re all familiar with those tiny black dots…).

Brita and MAVEA are not the only water filtration pitchers on the market today. Many companies that manufacture water filters have pitchers somewhere in their product lines, including GE, Culligan and PUR. Each of these brands has something unique to offer. With so many options, how do you go about choosing the best one?

  • Find out what’s in your water. The reduction of chlorine taste and odor, along with chlorination byproducts, is a given with most water filter pitcher brands. Some pitchers also reduce microbiological cysts, heavy metals, pharmaceutical traces, and agricultural and industrial pollutants.
  • Pick a price point. Obviously, affordability is a major priority for most consumers. How much are you willing to spend?
  • Look for the design that best suits your needs. How much space in your refrigerator are you willing to sacrifice for a water filter pitcher? Will you use your pitcher while entertaining guests? If so, how important is appearance? Some pitchers have an opening in the lid to allow for convenient, one-handed refills under the faucet.

These steps are in no particular order. Which of them do you consider most important? (Hint: take our latest poll.)