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Thread: Green Hair from well water

  1. #1
    srt8 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Green Hair from well water

    Recently switched our house to well water. Water test results:
    pH 4.5
    alk 95ppm
    iron 0
    nitrate 0

    Apparently, there's another mineral causing the greenish tint to our hair. I'd like to install in line filters (hot and cold) to the shower and whirlpool tub in the masterbath to resolve this problem. Showerhead filters look cumbersome and I have no problem accessing the pipes (all copper) from below.

    What filters should I get?

    Phil in Jefferson GA

  2. #2
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
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    You have a serious pH problem You need to adjust your pH to near or above 7.0.

    Your problem is compounded by having copper plumbing. Eventually, the pipe will deteriorate to the point they develop pin holes and water will come out. If these pin holes happen behind walls, you are in big trouble.

    As pH drops below 5.0, sometimes it is motre than just a high level of gaseous build up and may include mineral acids. Nonetheless, you will need to address this asap.

    The green tint you are expereincing is most likely the copper breaking down and staining 'bout everything it touches.

    A simple acid neutralizer (Calcite filter) won't work, or at least it won't bring it to a satisfactory level. Even mixing Calcite with mag-oxide will fall short. One method may be a sodium hydroxide (strong base) feed. This will help resolve acid water and won't raise hardness levels.

    Ideally, it would be good to re-plumb to plastic plumbing...and neutralize acid.

    Don't wait till the pipes explode. get on it now.

    Andy Christensen, CWS-II

  3. #3
    srt8 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Green Hair from Well Water

    I retested the pH with a more reliable method (the 4.5 came from a test strip). The result, with two different brands of tester, was 6.8 pH. Still below minimum but not nearly as bad.

    With this pH level is it possible to raise the pH in a consistant and economical manner?

    Phil

  4. #4
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
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    Well, the difference in those test results is too wide to be valid. Get another test with a more reliable method. I have never had good faith in test strips.

    Get those tests done and get back to us. A local water treatment company can do accurate tests.

    6.8 is not bad and can very easily be adjusted if you feel that is needed.

    Andy Christensen, CWS-II

  5. #5
    Gary Slusser is offline Banned
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    Quote Originally Posted by srt8
    I retested the pH with a more reliable method (the 4.5 came from a test strip). The result, with two different brands of tester, was 6.8 pH. Still below minimum but not nearly as bad.

    With this pH level is it possible to raise the pH in a consistant and economical manner?

    Phil
    Since you have green staining in your hair, which says there is quite a bit of copper in your water, you may have a fluctuating pH or a hot water recirculation system causing erosion corrosion of copper tubing adding copper to the water.

    You would want to do pH tests at roughly the same time of day for a number of days, like a week or two and to have a test done on your water for copper.

    Usually test strips are quite good because you don't need Olympic target rifle at 3500 meters accuracy; a shot gun approach usually works very well.

  6. #6
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
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    Getting an accurate test results is always preferred. PH problems can be solved by a number of different methods and knowing the pH to its most exact count can greatly determine the type of equipment, media and quantity to regain neutral water.

    In my experience, test strips rarely satisfy my need for accuracy. As you have stated the test strip reading was greatly different from the other method, which may have been through titration.

    Get good results and you will get better quality through the equipment you decide on.

    Andy Christensen, CWS-II

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