Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Advantage and Disadvantage of Filtration

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    31

    Default Advantage and Disadvantage of Filtration

    Filtration is the most effective form of water treatment and purification is obtained at the time. to reduce carbon filters and multimedia capabilities in the treatment of reverse osmosis and distillation. They retain all the qualities of the two filter systems, while successfully removing impurities from the water to others. They are able to get rid of composite materials such as salt-water lake, where much smaller and selective removal of hazardous chemicals such as chlorine and pesticides, reverse osmosis and distillation.

    Set as carbon filters and media for both chemical and physical processes of filtration, they are able to selectively remove large amounts of drinking water contaminants. Water filters can remove small, but dangerous chemical pesticides and herbicides, and trace elements to secure through the filter with water. Conservation of minerals and trace elements in water results in a much healthier source of drinking water.

    Besides doing the slow filtration and activated carbon filters are not expensive energy sources such as reverse osmosis and distillation units. If systems and carbon filter media without heat or pressure, they are very profitable. Water and carbon filter media, a relatively small amount of wastewater in the filtration.

  2. #2
    ted
    ted is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    western Oregon
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I want to collect rain water - filter it for use. my Design Idea: downspout to container covered with a window screen. next level - couple inches of river rock. next level - couple inches of sand. next level - charcoal.
    each level separted with maybe a cotton cloth.
    if this is a not workable idea - pls let me know.
    where can I get bulk charcoal ?

  3. #3
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Port Clinton, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    750

    Default

    What is the end use of the water---gardening? Utility water? drinking water? Being collected off a roof? Are there farms nearby? Any trees next to the collection site? Are you in a freezing location?
    The configuration you are suggesting is not recommended. This 'media' would soon be contaminated with organics and would soon start smelling like a mulch pile. There is no cleaning of the media and it would need to be replaced often. There is no disinfection device in your set up.

    Rainwater harvesting first requires a sizable container/cistern (>1000 gallons). Pumps, filters, and other equipment are all to be designed after its ulitmate use is known. Normally, water is collected and then treated either while it is in the tank, or during transporting to final use, or both. There are many rain catchment systems in my area and some of them are truly frightening. Gives us more details.

    Andy Christensen, CWS-II

    Gives us more infprmation

  4. #4
    ted
    ted is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    western Oregon
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I got this idea from the pets I had. they all prefered rain water to tap. some of this water would collect in flower pots that
    didnt have darainage holes and to me was gross LOL.
    plus I have heard that plants do better than from tap. Plus - maybe its what messes US up even a little bit over time.
    plus - I have started a new hobby - what to do when retired LOL - pottery, and its been mentioned in some forums that
    they perfer rain water when mixing clay.
    and, yes I might use it for makeing my coffee, which I drink a lot of, mostly coffee flavored water LOL.
    forgot to mention that I was going to get one of those uv lights that is used commercially to purify. I am only thinking in
    the 50 to 100 gal range of collection with a overflow pipe run out to the street.
    Yes, off the roof of a mobile home - town size approx 22k. Roseburg Oregon. home to be in one of the city trailer parks.
    havent moved there yet - waiting on better prices LOL.
    the holding tank(s) would be inside my shop so it wouldnt freeze. Home depot sells a 50gal for this usage but I thought about
    filtering it as I mention before for better usage.
    this all , , is why I knew I should ask ?? before I pay bucks for stuff - dont have much of that LOL.
    thanks for answering.
    ted

  5. #5
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Port Clinton, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    750

    Default

    If only for pets then simple filtration may work---all depends on what contaminants exist ii the water (on your roof). Roofs are a fantastic place to collect pollutants ranging from farming chemicals to bird feces to roofing materials to rotting leaves and other organics....eavestroughs are even worse. Then storage must be inhibited from colonization of organic growth and infestion of insects or disturbance of animals looking for refreshment and quenching.

    This is not to say that it is unsurrmountable but great attention needs to be given to be asure that if the water is to be consummed, that it is safe and unhealthful contaminants are removed, sanitzed or disinfected. Rain catchment is a whole 'nother aspect of water treatment and can be done with success. I collect rain water for my garden using a series of $14.00 35-gallon trash cans and connected with 1/2" garden hoses. Looking in the cans, one would be sure not to drink it, though.

    Whole societies like the Bahamas depend on rain water but they have macro- and micro-facilities to assure users of safety as well as supply.

    Filtration series would the first hurdle. Yes, a screen to keep the logs and frogs out and graduating down to a sub-micron level (ceramic filters) will aide in clearing the water for disinfection, which can be done by UV, ozone, distillation, iodine, chlorination or hydrogen peroxide to name a few---boiling can be a standby for disinfection but not making water cleaning as it actually makes water 'dirtier'. Finally, I would prefer reverse osmosis as a final stage before consumption. Even then, have a lab test the water for pathogens and other contaminants. Lastly, once a system is in, it will need constant maintenance. I have seen great systems go haywire through ignorance in the lack of maintaining equipment and the old ostrich with its head in the sand emerges. Monitor and test the water...you can't manage what you can't measure.

    Do your research; there is a lot on-line that can be a great source of knowledge and available equipment. It is not impossible but care must be given--clarity in knowledge will help with clarity in water.
    Last edited by Andy CWS; 06-05-2011 at 09:18 AM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •