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Thread: Ideal Booster Pump Setup Questions

  1. #1
    tommygunner is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1

    Default Ideal Booster Pump Setup Questions

    I recently purchased a booster pump for my 5 stage drinking water RO system to help resolve the low water pressure issue. The pressure is typically about 35-40PSI without the pump.

    Currently the pump is temporarily in between the 3rd stage and the membrane. It seems to be working but not as fast as I expected. It took approximately 2-3 hours to fill an empty RO tank.

    I do have some concerns about the current setup. First, I have a 1 micron sediment filter for the first stage. I think this may lead to a slow point after the pump sucks water from the 3rd, 2nd then slows up when sucking from the 1 micron filter.

    Rather than just replace the 1st stage with a 10 micron filter to speed up the flow and hope that pump sucks it through, I was thinking of adding an additional prefilter and moving the pump between the pre-filter and 1st sediment filter. For pre-filter I was thinking 10-30 micron, then maybe 10 or 5 micron for 1st stage after the pump and so on.

    There seems to be two different configurations for the booster pump. One is to place the pump directly before the membrane but after the prefilters. The other is to put a filter in front of it and place it in front of stage one. Some have stated that putting directly after the prefilters before the membrane is best as it puts less wear and tear on the pre-filters.

    This argument seems a bit hard for me to understand. First, prefilters are some of the cheapest filters. I would think extra water pressure against them would help them to filter out stuff. Also, pushing water should move water quicker than hoping that a vacuum sucks the water from the prefilters. I would guess that with all the space inside the RO filter housing containers, that there isn't much of a strong vacuum.

    The current booster pump is a Chinese variety that has elbow joints for the inlet and outlet. Is the elbow absolutely necessary? Can I run a straight line to the inlet and out instead?

    Another concern I have is that both the inlet and outlet adapters screwed in are 1/4". The water line coming out of the wall is 3/8". My idea is to run several loops of 3/8" water line under the sink like they do inside refrigerators for cold water, then run 3/8" to the inlet side of the pump. The idea is that if someone gets a big glass of water, there will be enough water available nearby to push though the system vs having the pump suck really hard pulling water from a long distance though the walls, attic, etc.

    Does anyone have any comments or suggestions about such a setup?

  2. #2
    pawaterguy is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    193

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tommygunner View Post
    I recently purchased a booster pump for my 5 stage drinking water RO system to help resolve the low water pressure issue. The pressure is typically about 35-40PSI without the pump.

    Currently the pump is temporarily in between the 3rd stage and the membrane. It seems to be working but not as fast as I expected. It took approximately 2-3 hours to fill an empty RO tank.

    I do have some concerns about the current setup. First, I have a 1 micron sediment filter for the first stage. I think this may lead to a slow point after the pump sucks water from the 3rd, 2nd then slows up when sucking from the 1 micron filter.

    Rather than just replace the 1st stage with a 10 micron filter to speed up the flow and hope that pump sucks it through, I was thinking of adding an additional prefilter and moving the pump between the pre-filter and 1st sediment filter. For pre-filter I was thinking 10-30 micron, then maybe 10 or 5 micron for 1st stage after the pump and so on.

    There seems to be two different configurations for the booster pump. One is to place the pump directly before the membrane but after the prefilters. The other is to put a filter in front of it and place it in front of stage one. Some have stated that putting directly after the prefilters before the membrane is best as it puts less wear and tear on the pre-filters.

    This argument seems a bit hard for me to understand. First, prefilters are some of the cheapest filters. I would think extra water pressure against them would help them to filter out stuff. Also, pushing water should move water quicker than hoping that a vacuum sucks the water from the prefilters. I would guess that with all the space inside the RO filter housing containers, that there isn't much of a strong vacuum.

    The current booster pump is a Chinese variety that has elbow joints for the inlet and outlet. Is the elbow absolutely necessary? Can I run a straight line to the inlet and out instead?

    Another concern I have is that both the inlet and outlet adapters screwed in are 1/4". The water line coming out of the wall is 3/8". My idea is to run several loops of 3/8" water line under the sink like they do inside refrigerators for cold water, then run 3/8" to the inlet side of the pump. The idea is that if someone gets a big glass of water, there will be enough water available nearby to push though the system vs having the pump suck really hard pulling water from a long distance though the walls, attic, etc.

    Does anyone have any comments or suggestions about such a setup?
    It would be a lot simpler to just place an RO quality air charged storage tank at the sink so you have good pressure and a couple of gallons ready to tap. Just a thought.

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