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Thread: Well water water spots on cars

  1. #1
    srt8 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Well water water spots on cars

    My well water is 7.2ph and leaves white water spots all over my car when I wash it unless a dry it immediately...and it's tought to wash and dry at the same time. What filter (or treatment) can I use to reduce the spotting?

    Phil in GA

  2. #2
    Gary Slusser is offline Banned
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    The things that cause water spots are usually hardness, high TDS (total dissolved solids), sulfates and chlorides.

    There is no filter to remove/reduce all of them; or most of them. You'd need a water softener and anion filter that is regenerated with salt or, a very large RO unit for a spot free rinse.

  3. #3
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by srt8
    My well water is 7.2ph and leaves white water spots all over my car when I wash it unless a dry it immediately...and it's tought to wash and dry at the same time. What filter (or treatment) can I use to reduce the spotting?

    Phil in GA
    Could you get a more thorough water test? Find out how hard your water. Usually a softener will solve heavy spotting so as not to be a big problem (depending on hardness level). You can remove 'soft' spots with a moist towel dampened with RO or distilled water.

    There are few demands for a large RO outside of commecial applications. What other ways is the water used, typical reisdential?

    Andy Christensen, CWS-II

  4. #4
    srt8 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Water spots from well water

    The calcium hardness is 80 ppm. I use the well water mainly for irrigation but, with permanent restrictions on muncipal water due to drought here in GA, I also use it for the now forbidden pleasures of swimming pool refill and car washing. It takes quite a bit of adjusting in the swimming pool so I'm not surprised I'm having spotting problems. The cars are hobby cars and I don't want to compromise their appearance. Thanks for your help.

  5. #5
    lilypotter2009 is offline Junior Member
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    It's easy to remove water spots from car paint if you know the right tricks. But otherwise, it can be a very frustrating experience...

    Mineral deposits can be left behind when water evaporates from the surface of your car. (Water evaporates, but the minerals don't!) Fortunately, most of these deposits rest on the surface of your paint, and in some cases, simply pouring on a white vinegar and water solution for 10 minutes will eat through the mineral deposit (while leaving the paint in tact). But in other cases, removing water spots requires some careful washing - and these extra car care tips!

    The problem starts when the mineral deposits have bonded with the paint, so even a thorough car wash leaves the minerals clinging to your paint job. In situations like this, experts using a special non-abrasive rub (like Meguiar's "Smooth Surface Clay Kit"). Just spray on a lubricant, and then wipe the clay over the water spot/mineral deposit. Amazingly, the minerals are absorbed into the clay - and this should leave behind clean paint!

    Unfortunately, some mineral deposits leave small dents, or "etches", into the surface of your paint job - especially if they've been baked into the surface by the heat of the sun. (Some people even recommend that you wash your car in the shade!) Meguiar's recommends a scratch cleaner - followed by a new coat of wax, to protect the paint - but others suggest that a paint polishing solution might work just as well.

    One web pag has some even better advice: prevent water spots from forming on your car. ("Continuously wiping the car with same damp cloth causes some film of water being left behind on the paint... This could be avoided by using two or more dry cloths as follow-up after you've wiped with the first one.") And if you're interested in shielding your paint job from water spots altogether, they recommend a good car wax.

    Old paint jobs may be more susceptible to water spots than newer paint jobs - so keep an eye on your car. And remember that sunlight will make water spots worse, so always try to choose your parking space carefully. If you care about the way your car looks, you'll want to do more than just drive it home with a good paint job. You'll also want to take care of that paint job, so your car keeps looking good even after it's left the lot!
    Last edited by rscardigno; 09-14-2009 at 07:59 PM.

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