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Thread: Best way to get rid of the following?

  1. #1
    DYH
    DYH is offline Junior Member
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    Default Best way to get rid of the following?

    Hi all,

    I've been doing a lot of research on water filters. It seems like it's come down to either: Fluoride Removal>KDF/GAC>0.5 Micron Carbon Block or RO with a 0.5 Micron Carbon Block to reduce VOCs. Based on this report for where I live can someone tell me which method would be better? http://projects.nytimes.com/toxic-wa...5-east-bay-mud

    If I can get the simple under the sink filters to deal with this problem as effectively as possible then I'll do that, as RO is more difficult to maintain and wastes water etc, but of course having clean water for health is the primary concern, so I'll do what I have to do to achieve that.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    NH Master is offline Senior Member
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    I can't get your link to load. What condition(s) exactly are you trying to treat ?

  3. #3
    DYH
    DYH is offline Junior Member
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    Thanks for the reply. Strange that it's not loading. I just clicked on it from this forum and it opened in a new tab/window for me.

    Here is another link to the study with maybe more detailed information: http://www.ewg.org/tap-water/whatsin...y-mud/0110005/

    I'll try to copy and paste from the NY Times page here:

    3 contaminants below legal limits, but above health guidelines

    In some states a small percentage of tests were performed before water was treated, and some contaminants were subsequently removed or diluted. As a result, some reported levels of contamination may be higher than were present at the tap.
    Number of Tests
    Contaminant Average result Maximum result Health limit Legal limit Total
    # Positive result Above health Above legal Monthly Testing History Chart key at top of page E.P.A. regulated
    Alpha particle activity 0.78 pCi/L 0.92 - 15 2 2 2 0 Yes
    Radium-226 0.15 pCi/L 0.23 0.05 5 2 2 2 0 Yes
    Radium-228 0.04 pCi/L 0.07 0.02 5 2 1 1 0 Yes
    9 contaminants found within health guidelines and legal limits
    Number of Tests
    Contaminant Average result Maximum result Health limit Legal limit Total
    # Positive result Above health Above legal Monthly Testing History Chart key at top of page E.P.A. regulated
    Aluminum 9.76 ppb 160 - - 210 42 0 0 No
    Beryllium (total) 0.02 ppb 1.38 4 4 143 3 0 0 Yes
    Combined Uranium (pCi/L) 0.03 pCi/L 0.07 15 15 2 1 0 0 Yes
    Gross beta particle activity (pCi/L) 1.77 pCi/L 2.82 15 15 2 2 0 0 Yes
    Manganese 0.05 ppb 22.70 300 - 212 1 0 0 No
    Nitrate 0.00 ppm 0.50 10 10 204 1 0 0 Yes
    Nitrate & nitrite 0.01 ppm 0.49 10 10 204 7 0 0 Yes
    Total haloacetic acids (HAAs) 16 ppb 16 70 60 1 1 0 0 Yes
    Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) 28 ppb 28 - 80 1 1 0 0 Yes

  4. #4
    NH Master is offline Senior Member
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    From this site, go to the home page and look under point of use filtration. Then take a look at Watts under sink filtration stuff, including RO filtration. Very easy to install and maintain and the replacement cartridges are reasonably priced.

  5. #5
    Gary Slusser is offline Banned
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DYH
    Hi all,

    I've been doing a lot of research on water filters. It seems like it's come down to either: Fluoride Removal>KDF/GAC>0.5 Micron Carbon Block or RO with a 0.5 Micron Carbon Block to reduce VOCs. Based on this report for where I live can someone tell me which method would be better? http://projects.nytimes.com/toxic-wa...5-east-bay-mud

    If I can get the simple under the sink filters to deal with this problem as effectively as possible then I'll do that, as RO is more difficult to maintain and wastes water etc, but of course having clean water for health is the primary concern, so I'll do what I have to do to achieve that.

    Thanks!
    How much of those things do you actually have in your water?

    Yes RO uses water to improve the quality of the water it makes but why do you think that "wastes water"? The human body doesn't require a shower a day, a vehicle doesn't require washing every week or month... clothes don't require washing after wearing them for just a few hours.... etc..

    And no combination of mechanical filters will produce the same quality as water from an RO.

  6. #6
    dimewater Guest

    Default Benefits to installing a water treatment system such as reverse osmosis

    Benefits to installing a water treatment system for home applications include removing disagreeable tastes and odors, including objectionable chlorine, many chemicals and gases, and in some cases it can be effective against microorganisms. In particular, reverse osmosis is highly effective in removing up to 99% of contaminants in water. It removes several impurities from water such as total dissolved solids, turbidity, asbestos, lead and other toxic heavy metals, radium, and many dissolved organics. The process will also remove chlorinated pesticides and most heavier-weight VOCs.
    Last edited by Andy CWS; 07-13-2010 at 01:37 PM.

  7. #7
    husle is offline Junior Member
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    Great link providing.
    Very useful link.
    Thanks for sharing it.

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