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Thread: Whole house water filter only last a month

  1. #1
    kaliber50 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Whole house water filter only last a month

    I bought a whole house water filter model GE GHWX40L back in 2007. I used it for 2 months and stopped using it after that. The first filter lasted less than a month and thinking that perhaps I had received a bad one, I decided to buy a second one. The second one also lasted a month and after that, I decided it was not economically sound to keep buying the filters on a monthly basis. So I just use the GE filter without the filter medium and today for some reason, I got the itch to find out more about my issue. Supposedly, according to the GE PDF for this model (http://products.geappliances.com/Mar...49-50220-3.pdf), the filter is supposed to last 3 months and mine are lasting only a month. I live in Brooklyn, NY and according to many, NYC water is one if not the best in the U.S. In 2009, "NYC Water Named 2009 Best Tasting Drinking Water for Metropolitan Region". So if NYC water is up there as far as quality, wouldn't it be safe to assume that the water is clean and therefore, whatever I am getting in my supply line should also be clean, therefore my filters should be lasting more than a month considering this assumption. Can any of you guys and gals shed some light on what can possibly be the issue? Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
    pawaterguy is offline Senior Member
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    Note that it says "at least" every 3 months. There is no rule of thumb when it comes to filter lives. It all depends on water quality coming to them (there is much more in the water that you can't see then you want to know about) and how much you use. They can guesstimate an average but no one amount of time if going to be the same for everyone. When you say it only "lasts" a month...what do you notice after a month? Reduced flow? Chlorine coming through? I need more info to help you out as best I can. One thought is that if it's not lasting very long you may want to double check the house for leaks. If you have water leaking...say a toilet running...that will be water use that you don't know you're running through the filter and depleting its' life unbeknownst to you.

  3. #3
    kaliber50 is offline Junior Member
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    Thank you Pawaterguy for replying. So to answer your questions, when I say that it only lasts a month, I mean that there is a reduction in water-flow. Could it be that there was a leak like you said? Quite possibly. As I mentioned, this was back in 2007. Now I should add, I just got done performing a water quality test for my tap water using a HM Digital tester. I took ten separate readings that were averaging about 37 ppm. After that test, I performed a drinking water test with the following results:

    Bacteria: Tested negative
    Lead: Tested negative
    Pesticide: Tested negative
    Nitrate:0.5 ppm
    Nitrite:0 ppm
    PH:6.5
    LR Total Hardness: 0
    Chlorine:0

    So my results seems to show that my water seems to be OK yet when I was using a whole house water filter, I can only assume that it wasn't working only after a month because perhaps the water was too dirty, dirtying the filter too fast too soon. This is very conflicting for me. What do you opine?

  4. #4
    Alex is offline Senior Member
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    Default Slow flow

    The filter sounds as though it is working okay at the start but reducing pressure over time. This is usually because sediments and particles will create a cake of debris on the outside of the filter, even though you cannot see it. Particles will plug up the tiny pores of the carbon and cause the filter to produce more resistance in the water.

    What filter were you using?

    You may want to try a filter that is not as constrictive and doesnt have as small of a micron rating. Since it is city water, I would assume you are looking for chlorine removal and would need a carbon filter.

  5. #5
    kaliber50 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex View Post
    The filter sounds as though it is working okay at the start but reducing pressure over time. This is usually because sediments and particles will create a cake of debris on the outside of the filter, even though you cannot see it. Particles will plug up the tiny pores of the carbon and cause the filter to produce more resistance in the water.

    What filter were you using?

    You may want to try a filter that is not as constrictive and doesnt have as small of a micron rating. Since it is city water, I would assume you are looking for chlorine removal and would need a carbon filter.

    Thx for responding. The filter model I was using was the filter model GE GHWX40L. Honestly, I wanted to find out why this filter was only lasting a month so that I could resolve the issue and resume using the filter if and when I found the problem. But after testing the water with my TD EZ HM meter and a water quality tester, I realize that if my tap water is at 34 ppm on average, there is no reason for me to even bother with filters. Everybody in the house actually started drinking faucet water although they do complain about the subtle chlorine taste so if I could buy something to take care of that, then all will be just peachy. What did you have in mind as far as chlorine removal? Thank you

  6. #6
    pawaterguy is offline Senior Member
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    I would look into a dechlorination unit...a big tank for of carbon that will remove the chlorine for the whole house. Follow it with a 5 micron standard 10" sediment filter and you're golden.

  7. #7
    Alex is offline Senior Member
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    The GHWX40L is the model of the housing, you can use different filter inside of the housing.

    GE doesnt include a filter with that housing originally, but GE makes the FXHTC to fit in the unit for chlorine reduction.

    You can use any standard 10" x 4.5" sized filter in your system.

    The Pentek RFC-BB is designed for whole house and is 25 microns to lprevent this from clogging.

    http://www.filtersfast.com/Pentek-WR...er-filters.asp

  8. #8
    kaliber50 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by pawaterguy View Post
    I would look into a dechlorination unit...a big tank for of carbon that will remove the chlorine for the whole house. Follow it with a 5 micron standard 10" sediment filter and you're golden.
    Ok...I will check it out online. I don't want anything big. But that's the kind of guidance I need since I know jack in this area. Thank you bud

  9. #9
    kaliber50 is offline Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex View Post
    The GHWX40L is the model of the housing, you can use different filter inside of the housing.

    GE doesnt include a filter with that housing originally, but GE makes the FXHTC to fit in the unit for chlorine reduction.

    You can use any standard 10" x 4.5" sized filter in your system.

    The Pentek RFC-BB is designed for whole house and is 25 microns to lprevent this from clogging.

    http://www.filtersfast.com/Pentek-WR...er-filters.asp

    Aha...Great info man!!!! Thanks a bunch!! Ah man, this can get technical I see. But again, thank you especially for specific purchase info.

  10. #10
    PRR
    PRR is offline Junior Member
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    NYC water is perfectly safe to drink, generally among the best city water.

    Since there's some old pipes in NYC, and possible germs, they do dose it with Chlorine. For drinking, you get a drinking-water filter, not a whole-house filter. There's kinds that go on the end of the kitchen faucet, ones that tap under the sink and dispense through a small faucet, and pour-through filter pitchers. These all use "activated carbon" which is good at grabbing chlorine for a few months. When the smell comes back a new filter element is typically inexpensive.

    > ...I will check it out online.

    I'm here because I like www.filtersfast.com which hosts this forum. Prices are good, delivery is good, vast selection. I don't work for them, I'm just a guy with a silty/gritty well.

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