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Thread: Iron/Manganese problem.

  1. #1
    maxim is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Iron/Manganese problem.

    Hello,
    I need help to choose whole house water system. Our water well is only 30 ft deep and has a submergible pump. We (2 adults, 1 child) have 1 full bathroom. I'm very handy and I just changed all plumbing pipes from 1/2 inch copper (too much built-up deposits) to 3/4 CPVC, installed new hot water heater, pressure tank. Now I need to select a house water filter system to make my family's live happier! The new water analysis report:
    Total or Fecal Coliforms - Absent
    Turbidity 1.5 NTU
    Color 1
    Odor N.D
    ph 7.4
    Calcium 18.8 mg/l
    Magnesium 6.2 mg/l
    Hardness 72.4 mg/l
    Nitrate Nitrogen N.D
    Sulfate 9.4 mg/l
    Sodium 11.2 mg/l
    Chloride 14.6 mg/l
    Copper 0.02 mg/l
    Iron 0.65 mg/l
    Manganese 0.75 mg/l

    We don't like the color or the taste of the water. My wife saying that after the shower her skin gets very dry. I only know that my Iron and Manganese levels over the limit. What else do you think is a problem?
    I only have 4 GPM flow rate from the faucet but 8 GPM right after the pressure tank. Which Iron/Manganese system is better in my case? I like the sound of "maintenance free" like Pyrolox, Terminox I.S.M, Filox, Birm.
    Thank you.
    Dmitry Malikov
    Last edited by maxim; 12-11-2007 at 09:53 AM.

  2. #2
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
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    Default

    According the the Water Qualty Association soft water is 2 grains per gallon or less, hard is between 4-7 gpg and anything over 10.5 gpg is considered extremely hard. You are at 72 gpg! Man, you have some rock-hard water.

    You did not describe what color the water is from the tap. Pour it into a white cup or bowl and if it is reddish then you may have ferric iron. If it is brownish, then it may be tannins. You need to determine which before any system can be suggested. Do the same test with both hot and cold. Your NTU is quite high and this indicates it may be tannins. Where are you located?

    Becareful of any "maintenance free systems", they often spell more headaches that they are worth. Some of these require addition aspects to work properly like an oxygen content of 15% or more in your water, etc. You will need a softener capable of handling your extremely high hardness. Since you did all the plumbing, yourself, then maintaining the system shouold not be overwhelming, one would think.

    A properly set up softener should take care of the iron (provided it is ferrous) and the manganese. Moreover, you would take care of the hardness as well.

    Be prepared to spend some money (and time researching) to solve your water issues. Moreover, you will need an RO for drinking water purposes after the wholehouse system is in place.

    I didn't see a TDS reading!? That is important, too.

    Andy Christensen, CWS-II

  3. #3
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
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    Default Mia Culpa

    Sorry, I made a mistake with the hardness. It's 72 ppm not grains per gallon. That makes a big difference and I will get back late on that. Sorry.

    Andy

  4. #4
    maxim is offline Junior Member
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    Both hot and cold water seems to be clear in the glass, maybe a little yellow. But when bathtub or children pool is filled than you can really see how brownish it is. (Not red) I have 5 micron sediment filter after the pressure tank and change it every week because it gets very brown. We live near Hartford, CT. I don't know what my TDS are, I need to buy TDS meter or take my water to the water lab to check it. I think RO system for cooking and drinking is a grate idea. Based on our water analysis, What kind of whole house water treatment system do we need?
    Thank you.
    Dmitry Malikov
    Last edited by maxim; 12-11-2007 at 09:52 AM.

  5. #5
    Andy CWS is offline Moderator
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    Your filter may not have a small enough micron rating. If 5 microns is not working, you don't want to go any smaller than that on a wholehouse application as it will clog too fast and cut pressure too often.

    You may have colloidal clay. A normal filter will not remove this and a collagulation may be needed. This is not a simple procedure as a chemical feed and backwashing filter are included in the set-up.

    Colloids are contaminants between true dissolved minerals and suspended minerals. They remain in solution but their specific gravity is nearly the same as the water so they don't settle out. Their size is too small for standard filter and may plug up RO membranes prematurely. They may appear in various sizes so some will be filtered out by your WH filter and some will pass through.

    I am not saying there is a health risk, but it does need to be treated if you want good water.

    TDS meters are availble and a decent one may cost about $30-$40.

    To determine colloids in the water, first look at visual results, which you have, and then NTU reading, which you have. The next step would be a lab test to truly confirm it. But if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck....

    What is your available space for water treatment? Are you tight for space?

    Let us know.
    Andy Christensen, CWS-II

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