Earth Day: Help the Environment and Go Reusable!

Filter-tap-water-save-environment

IMAGE CREDIT: oliveventures.com

On April 22, 2014 the world will celebrate Earth Day, an annual day in which various events are held around the world to show support for environmental protection. One of the best ways you can protect the environment is by going reusable. Many have switched to using reusable bags and more, but what about making the switch to reusable water bottles? I may be preaching to the choir, but there are serious disadvantages to drinking bottled water. Reusable water bottles are more environmentally friendly and save you the long-term cost of paying extra money for plastic water bottles. There are three main reasons for you to start (or continue) using reusable water bottles.

Reduce waste: Did you know that the materials used to package bottled water takes hundreds of years to bio-degrade? It is believed that more than 80% of all plastic water bottles are simply thrown away and becomes litter. An estimated 2 million tons of discarded water bottles clog our nation’s landfills.

Save Money: The above graphic says it all when it comes to saving money. We pay much more for bottled water than we do for tap water. You are paying around 5 cents an ounce (when you consider the price per ounces in the average plastic water bottle) versus about a cent per gallon for tap water. Regardless of claims, the regulations surrounding plastic water bottles are less stringent than the regulations surrounding your local water supplier. The US public water system is monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) which requires numerous daily tests for toxins and bacteria.

Be Healthier: Many plastic water bottles contain BPA (Bisphenol A) which studies have shown to be harmful to your health. It has been connected to cancer and hormonal issues. By switching to a reusable BPA-free water bottle, such as the Klean Kanteen water bottle, you are keeping your body protected from the harmful effects of BPA.

Many do not drink tap water because they question its safety or don’t like its taste. While these are concerns are understandable, there are solutions to this problem.

If you are weary about the taste or smell of tap water, carbon filters are the way to go. By reducing harmful bacteria and odors, you are left with filtered water that is free of smells, bad taste and chlorine. By installing a carbon filter inside your home (or even replacing your refrigerator water filter) you are reducing the amount of possible contaminates in your water supply and reducing bad taste and odor as well.

Stainless Steel Bottle

Reliable construction. Great fit for your house!

So are you ready to make the switch? If so, we suggest the Klean Kanteen Stainless Steel water bottle. Made from BPA free, food-grade stainless steel, this is an ideal alternative to bottled water. One of the best features of the Klean Kanteen bottles is found in its construction. These stainless water bottles will not impart or retain any odors or flavors. Unlike many plastic water bottles, the Klean Kanteen will not leech harmful chemicals into your drink. This water bottle is 100% recyclable, dishwasher safe, and is available in many sizes such as a 27 oz. capacity (pictured).

If you have already made the switch to reusable water bottles, congratulations! Urge your friends to do the same and drop the bottle! We offer a wide selection of reusable water bottles such as Vapur water bottles, and Brita water bottles. Browse through and choose which you prefer. In honor of Earth Day, let’s make an effort to go reusable! What is your favorite reusable water bottle? Don’t be shy and let us know in the comments below.

Friends Don’t Let Friends Drink Bottled Water

Evian spells naive backwardsWe don’t like to be the bearer of bad news, but it seems that water filtration advocates around the world are going to be disappointed today, because according to several news sources, bottled water sales saw a 4.2 percent increase this last year.

And, you may want to sit down for this next part…

Sales are expected to jump another 3 percent in 2011.

But don’t lose hope. Don’t let this news discourage you. You can make a difference. You can help us put an end to this madness.

It’s very simple: spread the word. Tell your friends the truth about bottled water. For example:

  1. Bottled water manufacturers use clever marketing tactics to fool consumers into believing that their product is the absolute best, and most convenient way to obtain pure water that is safe to drink.
  2. Bottled water is bad for the environment. Millions of non-biodegradable plastic bottles go unrecycled each year.
  3. Bottled water is very expensive, and is really nothing more than filtered tap water that you could easily get from home, at a fraction of the cost, with a quality water filter.
  4. Bottling companies like Fiji are taking good water away from the poor people in Fiji who really need it, and are shipping it long distances and selling it to Americans at ridiculous prices.
  5. Bottled water won’t necessarily protect you from hexavalent chromium contamination… a little known fact that may have contributed to the 2010 spike in sales. The Environmental Working Group recently discovered this contaminant in water supplies in 31 cities across the U.S., and they recommend a good quality water filter over bottled water as a solution. In addition, the EWG recently published a bottled water scorecard, giving filtered tap water the highest score available.
  6. Yes, many bottled waters do not contain fluoride, but you can get water that is fluoride-free right out of your tap by simply installing a reverse osmosis filter. Many RO filters also reduce chromium-vi, and in the long run, will save you lots of money.
  7. The bottled water brand name “Evian” spells “Naive” backwards…

 

These seven facts may be summed up in seven words: Friends don’t let friends drink bottled water. (Okay, so maybe it’s cliche, but you get the point.) I’m guessing that you probably have a lot of friends – virtual or otherwise – and social media is one of the best ways for you to help spread the word so that your friends are not labeled among the “naive” consumers. What’s more: we’ve made it really easy for you to do so; simply hit the “tweet” and “like” buttons at the top of this post. And if you’d like to spread the word on other social networks, you can do so by clicking the buttons below this post as well. Every share counts!

We’d also like to thank all of our friends who have thus far supported our efforts to provide everyone with affordable access to clean water straight from the tap!

Buying bottled water buys freedom?

America is the land of the free, right? Well some might argue differently, in light of recent Homeland Security developments (i.e. airport “security” checks.) The United States officially became free with the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. It’s the reason we celebrate the fourth of July every year with fireworks and funnel cakes. It’s the reason why a man walks through an airport “security” check in a speedo with an insulting message written to a certain politician scribbled on his back in bold, black marker, and doesn’t get labeled a terrorist … well, at least… for now.

As we’ve seen in recent controversial media reports over the last few weeks, these “freedoms” we have are precious to us, and if we comply with new procedures in the name of security, safety and comfort, there’s a chance we could lose them. Allow me to call your attention to a recent article published by the BBC: “Bottled Water has Become Liquid Gold.” This piece describes how bottled water rose to a global billion-dollar industry within the last 40 years, because of smart marketing. Through advertising that speaks directly to the human desire for luxury and convenience, this product has become all too appealing. One particular section of this article really got my attention – a quote by Richard Wilk, professor of anthropology at Indiana University:

“I think bottled water is the most revealing substance for showing us how the global capitalist market works today … In a sense, we’re buying choice, we’re buying freedom. That’s the only thing that can explain why you would pay money for a bottle of something that you can otherwise get for free.”

(Now, before I get attacked by the IBWA for referencing an “untrue” statement, we know that even tap water isn’t free. Technically we pay for it when we receive our water bill every month. What Wilk likely means here is, “That’s the only thing that can explain why you would pay ridiculous amounts of extra money for an environmentally-unfriendly, plastic bottle of something that you already pay for every month anyway.”)

That disclaimer aside – and I promise I’m going somewhere with this – Wilk’s quote suggests that people are essentially buying their right to choice and freedom every time they pay money for a bottle of water. In fact, “the right to choose” has been cited in several places as one of the reasons why bottled water should not be banned in colleges and universities. In today’s world, where freedoms and rights seem to be slipping slowly from our grasp with each new security measure, people are even more compelled to stand up and fight to keep them. But the willingness to pay for them isn’t doing much good. If bottled water is a symbol of the success of a capitalist market, buying it is only going to feed that market. And, in my opinion – feel free to debate with me on this – that market, and the greed associated with it, is the very thing that drives the policies that are slowly beginning to restrict our personal freedoms.

Sometimes, fighting for freedom means sacrificing security and comfort. Bottled water is one of the many symbols of security and comfort for those in the developed world, as it sets us apart from the less secure nations that don’t have access to clean water. It’s just a matter of where your priorities lie – with personal freedoms, or with comfort and security. In the name of the freedom upon which this Independent nation was founded, choose to drink filtered tap water, instead of bottled. It’s better for the planet, less expensive, less wasteful, it’s still purified, and you still retain your right to choose (along with preserving your dignity by resisting the temptation to get duped by clever advertising.) Seems like the more sensible decision to me – what do you guys think?