Going Green By Recycling Water Filters for World Water Day

Image Credit: tinleypark.org

St. Patrick’s Day is not the only reason why we’re celebrating “Going Green.” With Spring announcing its arrival next week and World Water Day falling on March 22, the call to action for being good stewards of our environment is more urgent than ever. If we don’t take care of our environment, our environment will definitely turn on us. We are paying homage to the value of going green as it relates to water. It comes as no surprise that the birthstone for March is an Aquamarine. This pale blue gemstone whose name originates from the Roman word “Aqua” meaning water and “Mare” meaning sea resembles the color of seawater.

For decades, we have grown familiar with the term “Going Green.” It is a ubiquitous statement that defines our worldwide ecosystem and the lives of humans and animal life everywhere. Around the world people, businesses and charities are making great strides by building communities to raise awareness about caring for and nurturing our neighbors and our planet.

As we prepare to celebrate World Water Day on March 22, Filters Fast would like to recognize some of our water filter vendors who have implemented impressive recycling programs for their products and going green initiatives.

Mavea offers a comprehensive recycling program where every part is broken down, cleaned and re-used. Nothing goes to the landfill. Return a minimum of 6 “Mavea” filters (only). They will pay the shipping costs. Simply request a pre-paid shipping label. https://www.mavea.com/mavea/mavea-recycling.html?L=0

Rainshow’r is now proud to partner with Active Recycling, an environmentally aware recycler, who understands our desire to limit our impact. For more information about their recycling program visit http://www.rainshowermfg.com/page6/page6.html.

Brita has a recycling campaign that recycles its carbon filters for the pitchers and faucet attachment models. For more information on recycling your Brita, filter visit http://www.brita.com/.

ZeroWater recycles their filters by separating each filter, then sending the plastic along with the materials inside to be sent to various facilities for reuse. Visit http://ww2.zerowater.com/recycling/ for more information.

Everpure water filtration products are recyclable and details on recycling locations can be found at www.everpure.com/ or  you can contact Everpure at (800) 323-7873.

Make sure you are only sending filters made by these companies to avoid being charged for additional shipping. Through recycling, we can significantly reduce the amount of waste that litters our landfills and save energy compared to creating new waste with new products. Everything we do or don’t do plays a vital role in the health and dynamics of planet Earth.

IBWA Settles Multiple Lawsuits

As we know from previous posts, the International Bottled Water Association has made multiple efforts to save face in the wake of environmentalist criticism. Two recent lawsuits, one against Eco Canteen, and one against ZeroWater, may be the organization’s most desperate attempts yet. In fact, these might even deserve a spot next to Nestle Waters as some of the most ridiculous lawsuits of all time.

IBWA has accused both companies of making “false and misleading claims” in their advertisements. These include the claim that plastic bottles contain harmful chemicals like BPA that leech into water, or that bottled water is unsafe and the act of recycling single-use bottles releases toxic substances into the environment. IBWA was victorious in its lawsuit against Eco Canteen, a distributor of reusable, stainless-steel water bottles. ZeroWater, maker of a 5-stage ion exchange water filter, has agreed to settle peacefully by retracting any and all false claims.

Perhaps the IBWA simply can’t handle all of the bad press it has received from bottled water critics – which could explain their recent back-to-back release of several online videos that advocate bottled water as a “safe and healthy alternative.” While it is certainly an alternative to less healthy sugary beverages, some might argue that the presentation of bottled water as “safe and healthy” in and of itself is just as “false and misleading” as some of the advertising claims made by the defendants in both lawsuits. A quick glance at our list of the “Top 10 Most Disturbing Things in Our Water” reveals that not all bottled water is as “safe and healthy” as  companies claim. (Pay special attention to #5 and #1 on this list, and you’ll see what we mean.)

In defense of the IBWA, it is true that the claims made by ZeroWater and Eco Canteen were indeed misleading. Though BPA and phthalates are used in the manufacture of many reusable plastic bottles, they are not contained in the single-use varieties.  Moreover, not all bottled water is unsafe or unhealthy, and it is certainly healthier than soda. Still, we can’t discount the negative environmental effects of the tons of plastic waste that go unrecycled each year – of which, single-use plastic water bottles are a part (albeit small). Nor can we ignore the ridiculous costs associated with this supposedly more convenient product. Bottled water is expensive, and in many cases is nothing more than purified tap water – a natural commodity that can easily be obtained from the kitchen sink with the use of a faucet water filter, or a reverse osmosis filter, if you’re looking for more advanced filtration. It’s not rocket science; mere common sense will persuade the average consumer that filtered tap water is a safe alternative that is both tasty and eco-friendly.

Frankly, such desperation on the part of the IBWA just makes me sad. Who’s next? Annie Leonard?